The University of Arizona

Wildcats Make National Wheelchair Basketball Team

By La Monica Everett-Haynes, University Communications | July 18, 2013
Members of the UA's Women's Basketball Team have been selected to serve on the U.S. team. The team is open to former and current UA students and also students attending Pima Community College. (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo/UANews)
Members of the UA's Women's Basketball Team have been selected to serve on the U.S. team. The team is open to former and current UA students and also students attending Pima Community College. (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo/UANews)

A group of UA-affiliated athletes has been named to the USA Women's Wheelchair Basketball Team.

UA team member Courtney Ryan said:
UA team member Courtney Ryan said: "Living with a spinal cord injury has been life changing, but I have learned so much about myself and my ability to adapt and achieve that I am constantly surprised. I am very grateful to the Disability Resource Center at the UA and coach Pete (Hughes) for believing in my potential and giving me the opportunity to establish a very special life here in Tucson." (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo/UANews)
Wheelchair basketball is played in accordance with National Collegiate Athletic Association rules and regultions, with a limited number of exceptions. (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo/UANews)
Wheelchair basketball is played in accordance with National Collegiate Athletic Association rules and regultions, with a limited number of exceptions. (Photo credit: Beatriz Verdugo/UANews)

The University of Arizona has strong representation on the USA Women's Wheelchair Basketball Team, which will compete nationally and internationally and vie for a spot in the 2016 Paralympic Games in Brazil.

Of the 16-member team, which is being led by Paralympic gold medalist Stephanie Wheeler of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, five are affiliated with the UA's Adaptive Athletics Women's Basketball Team.

UA affiliates on the national team are:

Also, UA alumna Kaitlyn Verfuerth, who earned a psychology degree, made the national team roster, but is not currently training at the UA. Verfuerth is a Paralympian wheelchair tennis player and a top ranking basketball player in the U.S.

"Making the team indicates that you are one of the very, very few individuals who are at the top in the U.S. We're so excited," said head coach Pete Hughes, who has led the team since 2004 and has trained athletes who have gone on to compete in the Paralympics in the past.

"They are getting a great opportunity, and it's just a great honor. They'll be playing against the best in the world," Hughes said. "There is a sense of pride that the hard work has paid off." 

Access to superior facilities and an expansive suite of equipmente has helped elevate the status of the basketball program. Team members also credit the University's financial and academic support, the collegiality among team members and the direction of coach Hughes for the program's succes.

Bloom, a lifelong swimmer who would have a hemi-pelvectomy, a pelvic amputation, after a 2006 vehicle accident, took an interest in basketball while living in Denver.

She began playing in 2007 with a community team and eventually decided to pursue studies at the UA, well aware of the competitive nature of the women's team and the resources available to student-athletes.

"I started playing basketball with women who have played a lot of international basketball, so it was always in the back of my mind that I wanted to play at an international level," Bloom said. 

She was able to move in that direction after enrolling at the UA.

"We all strive for that level of competition and we train a lot because we want to get better and help our team develop," Bloom said.

"It's a huge honor to be selected to play for the national team, and it also feels great to be able to reach a goal that I set out for myself that is so big," she said. "I thank the people I am involved with and who help me to train – my coach and the Disability Resource Center – and I thank the University of Arizona for giving me a scholarship."

Hughes said he leads the team through three strict goals: Education is first, support of the team is key and earning titles and gaining elite status holds up as the final charge.

"You need that education. That's first," Hughes said.

Bloom, who is working toward becoming a research professor, is focusing her studies on language use among individuals with disabilities. Eventually, she would like to inform the ways in which language is powerful in shaping identity, specifically around ability and disability.

Teammate Ryan, who is studying special education, aspires to help newly injured individuals navigate medical, public and recreational systems.

Poist, who is in the PharmD program at the UA, intends to establish a focus in geriatrics and would like to eventually work with hospital patients after earning her degree.

In addition to a strict focus on academics, Hughes also emphasizes intense performance. But that is not too difficult as the team members rarely struggle making it to 6 a.m. practices and being committed to competing, he said.

"They know they have to train like champions," Hughes said. "They're not comfortable with just making the team. They want to compete in the Paralympics, and it is their goal to win a medal for the team."

Ryan, previously a women's soccer player at Metropolitan State University of Denver, sustained a spinal cord injury in 2010, resulting in her becoming partially paralyzed.

"Following my injury, I felt that my life as an elite athlete was in the past," said Ryan, who eventually opted to train in wheelchair basketball.

"What she has done is really remarkable," Hughes said. "I don't like to tell my players that they are remarkable, but from not playing to making it all the way up to the USA team is really remarkable."

Ryan had been competing in Phoenix with her San Diego team when Hughes, who had also been in the city for a match, saw her play. Eventually, she would transfer to the UA, having been recruited by Hughes.

"I compete because of a desire to be the best I can be. I have fallen in love with basketball because I can be part of a team that is working towards the same goal," said Ryan, the youngest team member.

"Wheelchair basketball and selection to the national team have reminded me that 'once an athlete, always an athlete;' that I can make a difference in a sport and be a role model to others, whether I am running or rolling."

Contacts

Media Contact:

Pete Hughes

UA Women's Wheelchair Basketball Team

520-626-5499

pthughes@email.arizona.edu