The University of Arizona

Why Work at the UA? New Website Has Answers

By Shelley Shelton, University Communications | June 20, 2012

The new landing page for the UA's job search site will tell visitors more than what jobs are available.

WhyUA lets visitors browse the site based on their interests, using these links.
WhyUA lets visitors browse the site based on their interests, using these links.
Visitors to WhyUA.com can also find out more about the culture of the University and the surrounding area using these buttons.
Visitors to WhyUA.com can also find out more about the culture of the University and the surrounding area using these buttons.

Beginning today, would-be job applicants to the University of Arizona will have a much more interesting way to learn about what's available here, from why the UA is a great employer to why Tucson is a great place to live.

Human Resources is officially launching a website that aims to brand the University of Arizona and its surrounding community as an attractive place to settle down.

Conceived as an interesting and dynamic entryway to the UA Career Track job search website, WhyUA.com touts many reasons why people choose to move to this region of the country and, specifically, why they work at the University.

Instead of immediately going to a UA job-search page, job seekers will have a chance to learn about numerous issues that people consider when deciding whether to move to a new university or job, such as:

  • Faculty support
  • Opportunities to do research 
  • The UA's health sciences
  • Wellness resources for UA employees
  • Diversity in the Tucson area
  • Family-friendly employee benefits

"It came from the realization that currently the Web page we've had for six years for applicants to go to, to learn about the University, had very limited content, very stale, and did not do much to brand the University," said Chris Wolf, Human Resources recruitment coordinator.

The assumption behind the Career Track page has been that if you're there, you obviously want to work at the UA, so Career Track sends users right into job listings, Wolf said.

That meant "passive" job seekers – those who already have successful careers but are keeping their options open and looking around – were more likely to move on from the UA job website, he said.

"This new page is meant to capture their attention."

Chris Foree, the senior applications systems analyst for HR who did much of the technical work on the site, said the new WhyUA landing page breaks up the job website to make it easier for people to find what interests them.

People can find out what's happening on campus as well as in the community, with information that changes as new things happen in the area – for example, the Tucson Gem & Mineral Show when it's going on, he said. They'll also be able to learn about jobs that fit their own interests and background.

"The University of Arizona community is inseparable from the surrounding Tucson community – it's all one package, and we wanted to highlight that and illustrate the unique cultural and environmental offerings of the UA campus and the Tucson community equally," Foree said.

Meanwhile, he said, the site also will connect visitors to UA information specific to what their career interests might be and link site visitors to real-time postings of available positions in each of those areas.

Or, as Wolf put it, "from baker to brain surgeon."

The WhyUA site had a soft launch earlier this month. All in all, it's taken more than a year to pull together, Foree said.

Wolf said it's amazing how many career fairs he's worked, where people pass his UA booth and assume he's there to recruit students, not employees.

He's quick to point out that the UA was the region's largest employer in this year's Star 200 ranking of Southern Arizona employers.

"We are excellent at branding ourselves as a great place to go to school," he said. "This (website) is a key part of branding ourselves as a great place to go to work."