The University of Arizona

UAPD Chief Daykin to Retire

University Communications | August 22, 2013

UA Police Chief Anthony Daykin has announced that he will retire at the end of the year, though he will provide security-related guidance and advice for a period after.

UA Police Department Chief Anthony Daykin said: "Police officers have to live a balanced life. It’s what I do, not who I am." Daykin will retire from his post at the end of the year.
UA Police Department Chief Anthony Daykin said: "Police officers have to live a balanced life. It’s what I do, not who I am." Daykin will retire from his post at the end of the year.
UAPD Chief Anthony Daykin built strong relationships with all the law enforcement agencies in Tucson and the surrounding area and the police departments at Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University. (Photo credit: Norma Jean Gargasz/UANews)
UAPD Chief Anthony Daykin built strong relationships with all the law enforcement agencies in Tucson and the surrounding area and the police departments at Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University. (Photo credit: Norma Jean Gargasz/UANews)

University of Arizona Police Chief Anthony Daykin, a veteran of two law enforcement agencies, announced his plans to retire at the end of the year, capping a 41-year career that spanned from street cop to chief of police.

"Tony is well-known for his professionalism, his integrity and his passion for police officers and police work. He has been an exemplary leader for the police department and the campus community," said UA President Ann Weaver Hart. "We are grateful for his service and it will be a challenge to find his successor."

Daykin will officially retire as chief Jan. 2, 2014, but will be available to UA in an advisory capacity to assist in the leadership transition and to provide security-related guidance and advice as needed through June 2014.

Over the last 13 years Daykin has hired or promoted most of the people on the UA force, a police department unlike most others, given its role in policing a community of 40,000 students and 10,000 faculty and staff from all over the world. Add in a flood of visitors that can swell the campus population to more 100,000 for a marquis football game or an appearance by the President of the United States, and the department has a demonstrated need for officers with discerning minds, high cultural competencies and a desire to serve.

"We hire people who are extremely qualified, who want to help people, serving as much of an education role as an enforcement one," Daykin said. "Our department motto is 'Partners with Our Community' which is the ultimate form of community policing. Every member of the UAPD has embraced this philosophy."

The UAPD has been one of 60 campus law enforcement agencies accredited by the international Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies. CALEA accreditation requires documented evidence of a department’s expertise, preparedness, community accountability and professional excellence. UAPD has been accredited seven times since 1993, with the last two designated as meritorious.

His leadership roles also extended to the Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police, where he served as president of the organization, "I think that helped legitimize campus police departments among the other law enforcement agencies." He’s built strong relationships with all the law enforcement agencies in Tucson and the surrounding area and the police departments at Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University.

Daykin has been a strong advocate among the three state universities to keep guns off campus. His practical perspective on the consequences of carrying firearms to college was profiled in the New York Times in 2011.

He has been a community leader as well. He was a member and past president of the Saguaro Rotary Club Rotary Club and served on the board and as president of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Tucson. He also has had a long relationship with Special Olympics Arizona, serving on several boards and committees.

Daykin gives much of the credit for any success to his family and his values of honesty, integrity and competency.

"Police officers have to live a balanced life. It’s what I do, not who I am," Daykin said, and family connections helped.

His wife, Margaret Maxwell, is a UA alumna and UA law school graduate, who built a private law practice until February 1994 when she was appointed to the Arizona Superior Court Bench in Pima County as a Court Commissioner/Judge Pro Tem. His daughter, Riley Maxwell, niece, Jessica Maxwell, and nephew, Joshua Maxwell, all attended the UA, which gave him added insight to the student population.

Daykin has a master’s degree from Northern Arizona University, a bachelor’s from University of Phoenix and certificates from the FBI National Academy, International Association of Police Chiefs and the U.S. Department of State, among many others. His career in law enforcement spans 41 years, following a tour in Vietnam as a United States Marine.

Contacts

Source:

Anthony Daykin

UA Police Department

520-621-7539

daykin@uapd.arizona.edu