The University of Arizona

Noted First Nations Professor to Deliver Deloria Lecture

By Melissa Tatum, James E. Rogers College of Law | February 4, 2009

John Borrows is regarded as one of the leading leading scholars in affairs relative to American Indian populations.

John Borrows, a highly regarded legal scholar, has won numerous awards for his work in the area of American Indian and indigenous law. He will speak at the UA in February during a free and open event. (Source: University of Minnesota)
John Borrows, a highly regarded legal scholar, has won numerous awards for his work in the area of American Indian and indigenous law. He will speak at the UA in February during a free and open event. (Source: University of Minnesota)

John Borrows, one of Canada's leading First Nations legal scholars, will deliver the second annual Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program's Vine Deloria Jr. Lecture.

Borrows' talk, "Giants and Little People: Indigenous Law in Context," will focus on the interpretation and application of Indigenous law in a community context.

The lecture will be held noon to 1 p.m. on Feb. 6 in Room 204 of The University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law,'s Rountree Hall.

The lecture is expected to draw a large crowd. While the lecture is free and open to the public, the UA law school is asking that attendees register early. Admission is offered on a first-come, first-seated basis.

Using ancient Ojibway stories and contemporary texts, Borrows will explore the contemporary cultural expression of Anishinabek legal principles and their relevance for and relationship to other legal systems in North America.

Borrows, who is Anishinabe and a member of the Chippewa of the Nawash First Nation, is widely regarded as Canada's leading indigenous law scholar. He will be joining the University of Minnesota faculty this year as a law professor.

A recipient of an Aboriginal Achievement Award in Law and Justice, Borrows is also a fellow of the Trudeau Foundation, and a Fellow of the Academy of Arts, Humanities and Sciences of Canada. His scholarly work focuses on Aboriginal law, constitutional law, and natural resources/environmental law.

The Deloria Lecture was created by the College of Law program as a tribute to the memory and work of Vine Deloria Jr. who helped establish the law school's program and also taught at the college as the Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program 's Distinguished Scholar in Residence and Visiting Professor from 2001-2005.

Deloria Jr. left a lasting legacy as the preeminent American Indian scholar of the twentieth century. During his life, Deloria was an internationally respected advocate for Indigenous peoples rights, and a teacher, mentor and inspiration to the countless students, teachers and tribal leaders who carry on his vision today.

Contacts

Melissa Tatum

James E. Rogers College of Law 

520-626-9762 

melissa.tatum@law.arizona.edu