The University of Arizona

Mexican American Studies to Offer Ph.D. Program

By Rebecca Ruiz-McGill, University Communications | December 14, 2011

The new UA doctoral program in Mexican American studies will begin accepting students in fall 2013.

Mexican American studies professors Lydia Otero and Yolanda Broyles-Gonzalez with a local ballet folclórico group at the annual UA Hispanic Convocation. The department will begin accepting applications for its new doctoral program in 2013.
Mexican American studies professors Lydia Otero and Yolanda Broyles-Gonzalez with a local ballet folclórico group at the annual UA Hispanic Convocation. The department will begin accepting applications for its new doctoral program in 2013.

The University of Arizona has received approval to implement a doctoral program in Mexican American studies – the third program of its kind in the country.

The University will begin accepting students into the program in fall 2013.

The UA department of Mexican American studies has earned the reputation as an exceptional national model. The department takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of Mexican American life, culture and health.

In adding the doctoral degree, the department will build upon the critical inquiry of established disciplines such as anthropology, history, sociology and education, and it will offer new insights of knowledge emerging from cultural, gender, ethnic, sexuality, indigenous, immigration and global studies.

"We are overjoyed and excited that we will be able to offer this dynamic program," said Antonio Estrada, head of the department of Mexican American studies. "Our faculty has put a lot of effort into developing this Ph.D. major, and we envision that it will be a great addition to the UA's curriculum and of great benefit to Latino communities, both locally and nationally."

According to the proposal approved by the UA Faculty Senate, the program will challenge students to create and enhance research paradigms to further the knowledge base in Mexican American and Chicana/o studies by linking theory with practice, scholarship with instruction and the academy with the community.

And given the UA's location in the Southwestern U.S., Estrada said, "The UA is the ideal academic institution for the doctoral program and as a top-20 ranked public institution. We will be able to recruit some of the best graduate students into our interdisciplinary program."