The University of Arizona

Governor Names UA's 4-H as 2014 Volunteer Service Award Recipient

By Elizabeth Baker, University Relations - Communications | May 15, 2014
Children participate in 4-H activities at the Tucson Village Farm of 4-H. Photo credit: Judy A. Davis Photography
Children participate in 4-H activities at the Tucson Village Farm of 4-H. Photo credit: Judy A. Davis Photography

The UA's 4-H program has been recognized for its outreach efforts by Gov. Jan Brewer.

Arizona 4-H Youth Development accepting the Governor’s Volunteer Service Award in Mesa, Ariz., April 25, 2014. Pictured from left: Bryan Chadd, 4-H Youth Development associate agent; Paige Hill, Green Team 4-H; Deanna Mason, Lehi 4-H Club Leader; Kelly Slade, Lehi 4-H Club Leader; Dru Alberti, Queen Creek 4-H Club Leader; Kirk Astroth, director, Arizona 4-H Youth Development. Photo credit: Governor’s Office for Children, Youth and Families)
Arizona 4-H Youth Development accepting the Governor’s Volunteer Service Award in Mesa, Ariz., April 25, 2014. Pictured from left: Bryan Chadd, 4-H Youth Development associate agent; Paige Hill, Green Team 4-H; Deanna Mason, Lehi 4-H Club Leader; Kelly Slade, Lehi 4-H Club Leader; Dru Alberti, Queen Creek 4-H Club Leader; Kirk Astroth, director, Arizona 4-H Youth Development. Photo credit: Governor’s Office for Children, Youth and Families)

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer has selected the University of Arizona's 4-H program for a Governor's Volunteer Service Award in recognition of its statewide impact.

Established in 2002, the Volunteer Service Awards are presented annually to honor people and organizations that have demonstrated outstanding service to their communities and fellow citizens over the past year.

"Arizona 4-H is one of the major threads of the fabric of Arizona and it has been since before statehood," said Kirk Astroth, assistant dean and director of 4-H Youth Development in the UA College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. "4-H embodies the values of community service, civic engagement and volunteerism."

The program allows "young people to learn critical life skills, to learn science and to learn the things that will help them become college and career ready," he said.

Each year, a statewide panel of judges evaluates nominees based on need, action, innovation and impact of their service. This year, eight nominees were selected to receive the award, considered the most prestigious of its kind in Arizona. The awards were presented April 25 during a ceremony in Phoenix.

With programs in all 15 Arizona counties, on five American Indian reservations and on four military bases, Arizona's 4-H program offers more than 100 projects for youth involvement focused around science, agriculture, education and other areas.

More than 9,000 students ages 5 to 19 participate statewide in 4-H and an additional 190,000 are involved through 4-H-sponsored special educational opportunities. Those programs offer a multitude of educational programs in agriculture, animal science, civic engagement, arts, community service, environmental science, nutrition, leadership and more.

For more information about 4-H's statewide impact, please read this UANews story.